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2 edition of The disciple whom Jesus loved, with some remarks on the passages where these words are used found in the catalog.

The disciple whom Jesus loved, with some remarks on the passages where these words are used

by Woolsey, Theodore Dwight

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Published by s.n. in S.l .
Written in English


Edition Notes

Caption title.

The Physical Object
Pagination23 p. ;
Number of Pages23
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL25409105M

This is made clear in the following verses: “Truly, truly, Follow Me!” (John ). In Peter’s younger days he did as he pleased. In his later years, he would become subject to the will of others. In particular, John spelled out that these words of Jesus were a prediction that Peter would die the martyr’s death (verse 19). This book basically argues that the fourth gospel was actually written by Lazarus, not John, and that Lazarus was therefore the disciple whom Jesus loved. I am sceptical of any author who claims to bring a new interpretation of the Bible/5.

a literary device designed to catch the reader's attention and make them feel like insiders to the story; "Verbal irony" occurs when a character of the story says something that he or she intends to be sarcastic, derogatory, or unflattering but the reader recognizes that it is a profoundly truthful statement; "situational irony" can be seen in an event that has a negative or demeaning .   Lazarus probably, if he loved one above another, and it seems that he did if Mark and John are correct. In the Greek language of J Yahshua not only loved Lazarus (or whomever Lazarus stands in for), but he also liked Lazarus - two different.

CHAPTER 20 *. The Empty Tomb. * 1 On the first day of the week, a Mary of Magdala came to the tomb early in the morning, while it was still dark, * and saw the stone removed from the tomb. b 2 So she ran * and went to Simon Peter and to the other disciple whom Jesus loved, and told them, “They have taken the Lord from the tomb, and we don’t know where they put him.” 3 * .   In the Gospel of St. John, there is a disciple whom Jesus loves in a particular way. He is never named, just called "the disciple whom Jesus loved". But tradition says that it was the author, St. John himself, whom he humbly described only as the "beloved disciple". When Jesus therefore had seen his mother and the disciple standing whom he loved, he saith to his .


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The disciple whom Jesus loved, with some remarks on the passages where these words are used by Woolsey, Theodore Dwight Download PDF EPUB FB2

This banner text can have markup. web; books; video; audio; software; images; Toggle navigation. In my book The Jesus Dynasty (Simon & Schuster, ) I offer my reasons for thinking that the enigmatic figure in the Gospel of John, described as “the disciple whom Jesus loved,” or more commonly, the “Beloved Disciple,” is none other than James the brother of Jesus.

I am not sure who has suggested this over the years but I first. In the book of John, the apostle John writes many times about the disciple whom Jesus loved. John is one of them, “ the disciple whom Jesus loved, was reclining next to him.

” John“When Jesus saw his mother there, and the disciple whom he loved standing near by, he said to his mother, 'Dear woman, here is your son. The phrase "the disciple whom Jesus loved" (Greek: ὁ μαθητὴς ὃν ἠγάπα ὁ Ἰησοῦς, ho mathētēs hon ēgapā ho Iēsous) or, in Johnthe disciple beloved of Jesus (Greek: ὃν ἐφίλει ὁ Ἰησοῦς, hon ephilei ho Iēsous) is used six times in the Gospel of John, but in no other New Testament accounts of Jesus.

Thus, unless one can show that “the disciple whom Jesus loved” was John, it is unbiblical to call John ‘the beloved disciple’.

The Bible has much more for us to consider regarding this question and, thank God, the identity of the one whom “Jesus loved” can be shown from a study of the Bible facts alone. Chapter 7 Scripture vs. Tradition The Jury Summation. This study presented two cases: the case as to why the Apostle John was not “the disciple whom Jesus loved”, the author of the fourth gospel, and the case for why that author was most likely Lazarus – all with God’s word being the only authority cited.

Below is a summary to help you weigh the evidence so you can render a. Traditionally, the “the disciple whom Jesus loved” is John, the son of Zebedee. The “the disciple whom Jesus loved” was at the last supper (), and in the Synoptics we are told only the disciples joined Jesus for the Passover meal (Mark ).

This places the “the disciple whom Jesus loved” within the inner circle of the twelve. It is interesting that John referred to himself as "the disciple whom Jesus loved." Love was a recurring theme in much of John's writings, this from a man who had learned about love from the master teacher of love.

In John's letters (1, 2, and 3 John), he made more than twenty-five references to love. John knew that Jesus knew him and yet loved. “The Disciple Whom Jesus Loved” — The Five Verses. Now there was leaning on Jesus’ bosom one of his disciples, whom Jesus loved.

(John ) When Jesus therefore saw his mother, and the disciple whom he loved standing by, he saith unto. THE DISCIPLE WHOM JESUS LOVED. Take another look – The Bible has the answer.

Electronic excerpts are limited to words or le ss, however, longer excerpts are pe rmitted for use in book reviews. he always calls himsef “the dislciple whom Jesus loved”, the “other disciple” or “the other disciple.

Therefore that disciple whom Jesus loved said to Peter, "It is the Lord." So when Simon Peter heard that it was the Lord, he put his outer garment on (for he was stripped for work), and threw himself into the sea. Bible Theasaurus. Beloved ( instances) Disciple (51 instances).

The shadowy figure known as “the disciple whom Jesus loved” appears in five scenes in the Gospel of John (JohnJohnJohnJohn with John ), though some also regard the unnamed disciple in John as the beloved disciple.

In these scenes the beloved disciple stands in contrast to Simon Peter, who. God’s last instrument of revelation to His people, the guardian of Our Lady, the disciple whom Jesus loved was gone.

The Eagle had soared off into the heavens, out of the sight of men, to the place where those he knew and loved were waiting for him and where he should be with them in eternal happiness. And I saw a new heaven and a new earth.

The “disciple whom Jesus loved” could not be Peter, as Peter asks Jesus a question in regards to this disciple (John ). That leaves us with James or John.

Jesus made a statement about the possible "longevity" of the. The Bible singles out one disciple of Jesus as the one whom "Jesus loved" and The Disciple Whom Jesus Loved takes a closer look at what scripture says about this beloved disciple and the special role he played in the life of Jesus.

It searches the scriptures in order to highlight the facts in the plain text of scripture that are usually overlooked about this "other disciple, 4/5(49).

The mentioning of the disciple “whom Jesus loved” is used only after the raising of Lazarus in the Book of John. The love that is mentioned in John’s Gospel regarding Lazarus and the Beloved Disciple is phileo – a deep affection, a love of a dear friend, or a brotherly love.

Practice the love of God for us, just like the Apostle John who called himself "The disciple whom Jesus loved". Keep your eyes on God's fixed and unchanging love for us, and you will be settled. God wants us to be Christ-occupied, not self-occupied.

When you sin, God looks at your sacrificial lamb, not at you. In John’s Gospel there is mention of “the disciple whom Jesus loved.” This disciple (an apostle really) is never mentioned by name. However it is universally accepted by biblical scholars both ancient and modern, by the Church Fathers as well that this beloved disciple is in fact the Apostle John himself who writes the gospel.

This says of the disciple whom Jesus loved: “This is the disciple who is bearing witness of these things, and who has written these things; and we know that his testimony is true”. John and are also usually taken to refer to the Beloved Disciple. The first relates that when Jesus was arrested there followed Him to the courtyard.

However we take the setting, the impetus of the chapter is the restoration of Peter and the contrast of Peter’s future with that of the “disciple whom Jesus loved” (John ). Peter’s threefold affirmation of his love for Jesus restores his relationship with Jesus after his earlier threefold denial.

The Fourth Gospel refers in several places to the "disciple whom Jesus loved." Church Father St. Irenaeus attributed the Gospel of John to the Beloved Disciple. a preacher and hermit and forerunner of Jesus (whom he baptized) Elizabeth.

Jesus' last words on the cross are very different in Luke than the words of abandonment found in Mark.John English Standard Version (ESV). 2 So she ran and went to Simon Peter and the other disciple, the one whom Jesus loved, and said to them, “They have taken the Lord out of the tomb, and we do not know where they have laid him.”."One of them, the disciple whom Jesus loved, was reclining next to Him." John One of the most tender pictures in the gospel, is that which shows us one of Christ's disciples leaning on the Master's bosom.

No name is given. We are told that it was "the disciple whom Jesus loved." We know then, who it was.